Tips to Moving From the Dorm to an Apartment

Archive: Jan 2015

  1. Tips to Moving From the Dorm to an Apartment

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    Living in the dorms can be an exciting time for any college student. But just like there’s a time to move out of mom’s and dad’s, there’s also a time to move out of the dorms and into an apartment. This transition is exciting and stressful all at the same time. There are many things to consider. In this blog, we have compiled a few of our top tips to making the move from the dorms to apartment life.

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    Set a budget
    Before you start considering anything, you need to consider and set your budget. Know exactly what you can afford to spend every month in rent, utilities, food, and even furniture. The last thing you want to run into is underestimating your budget and signing a 12 month lease on an apartment you can’t afford to pay for. Many first-time renters live with roommates to help split the bills. This may be an option for you as well.

    Secure apartment in advance
    Once you know what you can afford to spend every month, you can start looking for an apartment. You’ll want to make sure to secure an apartment before you move out of your dorm. Especially in a college town, apartments get rented out quickly and far in advance. In some cases, still living close to campus requires signing a lease a year in advance.

    Be strategic about furniture
    You may have some furniture to bring along with you, and if you have roommates, they might have something to contribute as well. But often times first-time renters find themselves surrounded by seemingly empty rooms. Check out your local discount furniture store, or rummage sales. Ask your family members for any old pieces they’d be willing to part with. A modge podge of mis-matched furniture may not look as polished as you may like, but it’s better than sitting on the floor.

    There are many things to consider and plan when you make the move to your own apartment, but these are a few of our top tips, we hope they make for an easy move!

     

     

  2. Schwab Properties Frequently Asked Questions

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    We get many questions here at Schwab, so we decided to compile some of our more frequently asked questions into a blog! If you have other questions, feel free to reach out!

    Q1: How can I pay my rent?

    Answer: You can pay your rent online securely through our website http://schwabproperties.com/pay-rent-online/

    Q2: How can I request maintenance/repairs at my apartment?

    Answer: You can submit a work request right from our website

    Q3: How do I apply for an apartment?

    Answer: You can download a residential application from our website

    Q4: Do you allow pets?

    Answer: Sorry, no pets allowed.

    Q5: What are your office hours?

    Answer: Monday – Friday 8:30am – 5:30pm

    Q6: Do all Schwab Properties have parking?

    Answer: All properties have some sort of parking available.

    Q7: Do you accept section 8?

    Answer: Yes.

    Q8: Should I have renter’s insurance?

    Answer: It is always a good idea to have renter’s insurance.

  3. The “What To Do” Guide to Having Roommates

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    Whether you’re rooming with a long-time close friend, a handful of your fellow classmates or even if you roommate was a complete stranger until the day you started sharing a bathroom – whatever relationship you have with your roommate, there are some “do’s” and “don’ts” to sharing a living space. Luckily we have compiled the ultimate guide of what to do when you live with roommates.

    What to Do roommates image

    DO

    1 – Be clear, fair and honest from day one. This is important. Discuss each other’s’ schedules and lifestyles and be honest about your pet peeves and preferences. If you can’t handle a mess, vocalize that from the start. Also remember to be fair. If you work 3rd shift and need to sleep during the day, your roommate may need to consider their volume during day time hours. With that said, expecting silence at 3:00 in the afternoon could also be unrealistic.

    2 – Consider your roommate when you want to have company over. You may not have to work or go to class in the morning, but maybe your roomie does. If you’re planning a get together, run the idea by your roommate to make sure that won’t hinder anything on their schedule.

    3 – Clean up after yourself. Although it sounds like common sense, common sense is not always as common as we may think. Especially in common areas, it is very important to clean up after yourself. Kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms can quickly become cluttered and dirty and roommates pointing fingers to blame for the mess. If you make sure to clean up after yourself, you don’t have to worry about the mess being your fault and your roommates feeling like you don’t pitch in.

    DON’T

    1 – Don’t take or use your roommate’s things without permission. This rule is a pretty important one that again might seem like common sense, but if it’s not yours, you should get permission to use it before you use it. Not after, not while, before. Clothing, gadgets, cookware, toiletries, you name it – you need permission to use it!

    2 – Don’t sweat the small stuff. If you want to be happy, you have got to be good. Everyone has little annoying quirks, everyone has pet peeves. Living with another human is challenging, it is about compromise and it is about having patience, compassion, consideration and respect for one another. Don’t sweat the small stuff. If there’s really a problem, address is right away. But if you’re upset that your roomie brushes his teeth funny, get over it!

    3 – Don’t be closed minded. Again, no two people are the same. People can have very different lifestyles, preferences and beliefs. Having total intolerance for something won’t get you very far with your roomie. Try your hardest to have an open mind and respect other people’s opinions and beliefs. You may even be daring enough to try something new. Go ahead, it couldn’t hurt!

    There you have it! Living with roommates can be tough, but it can also be a lot of fun. As long as you have common ground, respect and a positive attitude, you’re all set!

  4. Part 2: Senior Year Survival Guide: The Bucket List

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    The BucketlistCollege has been an amazing, exciting and tribulating time in your life. But as all good things come to an end, so does college. With graduation becoming more than just a distant dream, and becomes a day marching almost too close for comfort; we have compiled this Senior Year Survival Guide to help you organize and strategize your final months and help graduation seem less daunting.

    We compiled a checklist of things to complete before graduation in Part 1. Part 2 is all about the Bucket List!

    The Bucket List

    Visit your favorite places
    Whenever you have a chance, take time to visit some of your favorite places on campus or in town. That coffee shop you used to study at freshman year to get out of the dorms, that tiny creek that runs behind all the buildings that you used to have quiet study lunches in the Spring and Fall. The popular sledding spot that you’ve been down far too many times and barely remember. The little dive bar that has the best bar food within walking distance of campus that’s always virtually empty and used to be your fourth meal spot. Take the time to re-visit and re-live those moments.

    Make time for your family
    When you think about college graduation, you generally don’t think about not seeing your family as much. But here’s the truth – the working world doesn’t give Spring and Winter breaks, the working world does not offer Summer vacation. The working world, especially for new grads is grueling and demanding. Plan to be working 40 hours on a generous week. Time with your family becomes increasingly limited when your responsibilities quadruple overnight.

    Say Yes!
    When someone asks you to go do something on campus, do it! Remember all the times you said no to something that didn’t seem to be that much fun, or you were tired from the night before, or whatever the excuse was – don’t make excuses (with the exception of school work)! Take advantage of all that campus and the city has to offer. Try something new, you might like it!

    Take in every moment
    Next time you’re surrounded by your best college friends, laughing and making memories, take a step back and appreciate this time. Appreciate that you have this time to laugh and enjoy this carefree moment with people you have grown to love so much. Remember that this time is limited and precious.